humo, leche y miel robots

Me and my nephew Esteban with the porcupine and Walker at the Eastern Bloc
Esteban with the porcupine at the Eastern Bloc during the Robotis Personae exhibition
Me and my nephew Esteban with the porcupine and Walker at the Eastern Bloc


my work @ the Eastern Bloc for the Robotis Personae exhibition.



first set-up of ferris-wheel, walker, porcupine and rocker, brainless because there's no code in their micro-controllers.



first set-up of ferris-wheel, walker, porcupine and rocker, brainless because there's no code in their micro-controllers.
first set-up of ferris-wheel, walker, porcupine and rocker, brainless because there's no code in their micro-controllers.




aka."They Might be Brainless" 2013-present

This was in the MFA gallery at Concordia University in June 2013. I was in the space for a week, showed all my sketches, circuit diagrams, and three of the robots: "Walker", "Rocker", "Porcupine" and the Ferris Wheel. They were still 'brainless'
brainless Rocker

Ferris-Wheel spinning






This was the first time I had access to a clean space. So, rather than a formal exhibition, I used the gallery as a working, studio space. I brewed tea, ran battery tests, shot photos, programmed a few simple directional changes, defended my thesis, and talked robots and mechanical links to everyone that wandered in. Invaluable. This is an on-going project. I'm experimenting with different ways to code, and a fourth robot (the blob) will also form part of this series... Walker's shadow
All the photos in above gallery were shot by Ian Woo.
         
Humo, Leche y Miel (Smoke, Milk and Honey) is made up of four robots and ferris wheel: the robots (nick-named, “Walker,” “Porcupine”, “Blob” and “Rocker”) range from four to five feet in height, three to five feet in length. Two are propelled by legs, like the oars on a canoe. The “Blob” has misshapen wheels. I built them to seem fluid, hermaphroditic, organic, but without hiding the clumsy mechanical and hand-made electronic elements. They are driven by surplus gear motors and rechargeable batteries. “Rocker” rocks in a somewhat unpredictable arc, but simple sensors will help the others navigate. I would like to add surface transducers to both Blob and Porcupine. Porcupine's tips have tiny vibrating motors that cause her to shake and clack. The ferris wheel (ten feet tall) turns very slowly. Instead of regular carriages, it has four aluminum forms that roughly resemble crustaceans or maggots.
June 2013 I tested everything together!         brainless-all_035

The pieces:The basic mechanical shells were built 2012-2013, but coding, experimenting, and trouble-shooting is on-going

Ferris Wheel aluminum, sound circuitry, hardware, motor, belt and pulleys, lights, power supply. 11' tall x 34” wide x 55” long.
Walker aluminum, paper, surplus motors, hardware, circuitry, sensors and software. 4' tall x 2' wide x 4' long
Rocker aluminum, motors, hardware, circuitry 44” tall x 26” wide x 55” long
Porcupine aluminum, motors, vibrating motors, hardware, circuitry, sensors and software 47”tall x 29” wide x 55” long.
Blob aluminum, rubber, hardware, roller-skating wheels 5' tall x 7' long x 38” wide. The Blob is an empty shell right now. I still need to add motors and circuitry.

humo, leche, y miel - writing

I wound up doing a lot of writing during this project. In case that interests you at all, here are 7000 biographical-art-working words about robotics and my work in 27 easily-digestable hunks. I heard a funny word, 'philosofugal' used to describe the fugue state induced by allowing academic theory to spread and smother artwork. So, the tone is conversational rather than theoretical, and not at all technical: 7000 words about... At some point I will also post technical data, including component's datasheets, favorite books and sites, and my production sketches. All these mechanisms are far simpler than they seem.
page 2, photos of building the bots icon-arrow-right 
Top